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New Addenda and Corrigenda

April 2, 2015

Companion and Guide boxIt has been too long since we last put on our website new addenda and corrigenda to our J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide: nearly a year in the case of the Chronology volume, and approaching two years since we updated the Reader’s Guide. New material is always coming our way to better document Tolkien’s life, and we still have some catching up to do in describing works by Tolkien published after the Companion and Guide appeared in 2006. We can’t be posting additions and corrections every week, but letting them accumulate for too long makes for seriously lengthy and complicated work fitting them into our various pages and keeping, or trying to keep, everything consistent in form.

We did at least post addenda and corrigenda to our Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion this past January, and to the new Adventures of Tom Bombadil collection at the end of December. Most of our older books have settled down, with very few corrections or additions occurring to us or being called to our attention; but it’s tempting fate to say so, and indeed, we have sent three or four to our website in this round.

Nineteen pages have been updated, as follows, everything on our list, in fact, except Wayne’s Arthur Ransome bibliography, and that could use an update as well!

 

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil and Other Verses from the Red Book

The Art of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

Farmer Giles of Ham

J.R.R. Tolkien: Artist and Illustrator

The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide in general

The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide in general, by date

Supplemental bibliography to The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide

The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide: Chronology

The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide: Chronology by date

The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide: Reader’s Guide

The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide: Reader’s Guide by date

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien index

The Lord of the Rings 50th anniversary edition

The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion, 2005 edition

The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion, 2008 edition

The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion, 2014 edition

The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion by date

Supplemental bibliography to The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion

Roverandom

 

Image: Spine of the boxed set of The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide.

 
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6 Comments
  1. Kris Swank permalink
    April 2, 2015 11:42 pm

    Hello Wayne & Christina! Thank you for clearing up the “steam” vs. “stream” question in “Once Upon A Time.” It’s also “stream” in “The Young Magicians” (p.255) which was the text I was working from for my essay.

    As always, many of us are in your debt for the amazing work you do!

    I hope you’ll be at K’zoo this year and we can meet.

    Best wishes, Kris Swank

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    • April 22, 2015 9:24 pm

      You’re welcome, Kris. Sorry we can’t be at the Kalamazoo conference, it’s always held at a time when Wayne is busy at work.

  2. Darrell Curtis permalink
    April 16, 2015 10:36 pm

    The effort you guys put forth to make these volumes accurate and relevant is admirable.

  3. Renée Vink permalink
    July 4, 2015 8:35 am

    This comment actually belongs in the comment section on the latest Bombadil edition. As you have closed the comments there, I’m posting it here.

    Right now, I’m translating the new material in the Bombadil collection (2014 version) for publication in Dutch, and I have a question regarding something you write at the end of the comments on “Bombadil goes boating”.

    You ask: “But how did Tom return home without his boat?” The answer would be, I think in the last stanza: “merrily the cockle-boat *homeward* they were bringing” (“they” being the Swan and the rest of the menagerie). Which means there is no mystery here. Wouldn’t it be better if I cut the last two sentences of the section from my translation?

    Regards,
    Renée Vink

    • August 16, 2015 11:01 am

      We replied to this comment privately to Renée, noting that the poem describes how Tom’s boat returned home, but not Tom himself.

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